New Meteor Crater Found

The CBC has a story about a newly discovered meteor crater found on the northwestern part of Victoria Island.   One of the discoverers was Brian Pratt from the U of S.  Brian was the speaker at the Second Annual Saskatoon Darwin Day.

Researchers from the University of Saskatchewan along with the Geological Survey of Canada have discovered the country’s 30th meteor impact crater — a 25-kilometre astrobleme created more than 100 million years ago in the Arctic.

The pit-like hole created by the impact of a meteor is in the northwestern part of Victoria Island, and located between Nunavut and the Northwest Territories.

Researchers named the discovery the Prince Albert impact crater after the peninsula where the impact happened.

“It’s another piece of the cosmic Earth puzzle,” Brian Pratt, geology professor at the University of Saskatchewan, said in a press release. “Impact craters like this give us clues into how the Earth’s crust is recycled and the speed of erosion, and may be implicated in episodes of widespread extinction of animals in the geological past.”

Pratt found the crater, with Keith Dewing, who works with the Geological Survey of Canada, two summers ago while exploring the area from a helicopter.

It took them two years to properly assemble the geological maps and submit their findings for publication.

Researchers from the University of Saskatchewan along with the Geological Survey of Canada have discovered the country’s 30th meteor impact crater — a 25-kilometre astrobleme created more than 100 million years ago in the Arctic.

The pit-like hole created by the impact of a meteor is in the northwestern part of Victoria Island, and located between Nunavut and the Northwest Territories.

Researchers named the discovery the Prince Albert impact crater after the peninsula where the impact happened.

“It’s another piece of the cosmic Earth puzzle,” Brian Pratt, geology professor at the University of Saskatchewan, said in a press release. “Impact craters like this give us clues into how the Earth’s crust is recycled and the speed of erosion, and may be implicated in episodes of widespread extinction of animals in the geological past.”

Pratt found the crater, with Keith Dewing, who works with the Geological Survey of Canada, two summers ago while exploring the area from a helicopter.

It took them two years to properly assemble the geological maps and submit their findings for publication.

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