Archive for July, 2012

CFI Saskatoon Summer Film Series

Posted in Event, Saskatoon with tags , on July 28, 2012 by saskskeptic
Sunday, August 19, 2012
11:30 AM
Venice House
906 Central Avenue
Saskatoon, SK S7N 2G8
Description

Not to admit we’re out of imagination, but we are planning another film offering for our August Meet-Up – we’re taking it easy and trying to get some relaxation in before the end of summer.

We’ve had the suggestion of screening Religulous, the Bill Maher docu-comedy, and Dogma, the Kevin Smith comedy, but are there any films we are missing?  We’re open to suggestions, so feel free to email an organizer and we’ll give it a try.

We do have a bit of time, but don’t delay in your suggestions too long!

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Video: Higgs Boson Part III: How to Discover a Particle

Posted in science on July 28, 2012 by saskskeptic

A video on the very large number of collisions need to confirm the Higgs Boson.

Video Sharks and Cameras

Posted in science on July 28, 2012 by saskskeptic

Will the teacher believe that a shark ate your …

View from the ISS at Night

Posted in news, science on July 27, 2012 by saskskeptic

I know everyone has probably already seen this.  If you have not, the following is a set of time-lapse images of the earth from the international space station.

Now tell me you don’t want to go to space.

[Via Gizmodo]

Video Best of “Earth As Art” — Top Five

Posted in news, science on July 27, 2012 by saskskeptic

The best NASA landsat pictures in video form.

Top Five ‘Earth as Art’ Winners

Posted in Skeptic on July 26, 2012 by saskskeptic

NASA has selected their top 5 Landsat pictures from 40 years of observations.

Lake Eyre is number 5

Click here to see the full set. [via  Gizmodo]

New Meteor Crater Found

Posted in news, Saskatoon, science on July 26, 2012 by saskskeptic

The CBC has a story about a newly discovered meteor crater found on the northwestern part of Victoria Island.   One of the discoverers was Brian Pratt from the U of S.  Brian was the speaker at the Second Annual Saskatoon Darwin Day.

Researchers from the University of Saskatchewan along with the Geological Survey of Canada have discovered the country’s 30th meteor impact crater — a 25-kilometre astrobleme created more than 100 million years ago in the Arctic.

The pit-like hole created by the impact of a meteor is in the northwestern part of Victoria Island, and located between Nunavut and the Northwest Territories.

Researchers named the discovery the Prince Albert impact crater after the peninsula where the impact happened.

“It’s another piece of the cosmic Earth puzzle,” Brian Pratt, geology professor at the University of Saskatchewan, said in a press release. “Impact craters like this give us clues into how the Earth’s crust is recycled and the speed of erosion, and may be implicated in episodes of widespread extinction of animals in the geological past.”

Pratt found the crater, with Keith Dewing, who works with the Geological Survey of Canada, two summers ago while exploring the area from a helicopter.

It took them two years to properly assemble the geological maps and submit their findings for publication.

Researchers from the University of Saskatchewan along with the Geological Survey of Canada have discovered the country’s 30th meteor impact crater — a 25-kilometre astrobleme created more than 100 million years ago in the Arctic.

The pit-like hole created by the impact of a meteor is in the northwestern part of Victoria Island, and located between Nunavut and the Northwest Territories.

Researchers named the discovery the Prince Albert impact crater after the peninsula where the impact happened.

“It’s another piece of the cosmic Earth puzzle,” Brian Pratt, geology professor at the University of Saskatchewan, said in a press release. “Impact craters like this give us clues into how the Earth’s crust is recycled and the speed of erosion, and may be implicated in episodes of widespread extinction of animals in the geological past.”

Pratt found the crater, with Keith Dewing, who works with the Geological Survey of Canada, two summers ago while exploring the area from a helicopter.

It took them two years to properly assemble the geological maps and submit their findings for publication.

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