Ley Lines

Standing at the Wanuskewin medicine wheel overlooking the South Saskatchewan River valley, one gets a sense of the immense time that has passed over this land. The exact purpose of the wheel is still unknown. The owner of the Sacred Places of Saskatchewan thinks he knows; he stood at these ancient sites and realized, with a start, that the sites he knew of were laid out in a straight line. Not really, as it turns out, but why would that be significant?

Ley Lines and Earth Crystals

A straight line connecting points of interest, especially ancient monoliths, is known as ley line. Ley lines may sound like ancient geomancy, but the term was invented in 1921 by British amateur archaeologist Alfred Watkins. He speculated that the alignment was caused by an prehistoric network of roads and navigation beacons criss-crossing Britain. His ideas were universally rejected by archaeologists. Watkins’ Ley line did not have the supernatural powers ascribed to them today. It was in the 1936 novel The Goat-Footed God that ley lines gained their occult-like powers. Dowsers claim to be able to find these lines, yet dowsing has never passed a controlled test and is hardly a reliable method of finding anything. As far as I can tell there is no repeatable scientific test to determine where ley lines are located.

Could such alignments happen by chance? Britain has a high density of archaeological sites due to its relatively small landmass, so it would be unsurprising for such chance alignments to be found. How good of a fit are these alignments? Well, here is where the pseudo-science begins. Maps are a 2-dimensional representation of a complex 3-dimensional object. How the map was produced, and what type of technology was used, will reflect on the scale of the map and its accuracy. Think of a map as a measurement of the real world; it has a certain lever of error associated with it. There are some people who have taken a map of the earth and have connected every point of interest that they are personally familiar with.

Ley Lines of the World

When faced with such a map, one should ask how it was created. This map was originally described in a 1975 publication known as New Age, which is – unsurprisingly – not found in Google Scholar. An excerpt goes as follows:

The main thrust of the article [which appeared in Khimiyai Zhizn (Chemistry and Life), the popular science journal of the USSR Academy of Sciences under the title: “Is the Earth a Large Crystal?”], based on studies made by the three collaborators of data taken from fields as widely separated as archaeology, geochemistry, ornithology and meteorology, was the suggestion that the earth projects from within itself to the surface a dual geometrically regularized grid. The first part of this grid forms twelve pentagonal slabs over the sphere from which evidence the research triumvirate suggested that the first shape of the earth had just such an outline. In other words, it was a dodecahedron.

Alfred Watkins’ ancient navigation markers have come a long way; apparently they now exist because the earth is crystal dodecahedron. Since the earth is very clearly not a dodecahedron, proponents believe the dodecahedron crystal is buried under the surface. The evidence apparently comes from Russian magnetic surveys, but these surveys are not referenced. The author did not even bother to show satellite imagery. None of the actual evidence is presented or discussed in any detail. The article then goes on to assume the dodecahedron hypothesis is true, and then marvel at how the dodecahedron model fits the cherry-picked evidence. The author marvels how one of the dodecahedron ribs fits along the Mid-Atlantic ridge. Remember that not a shred of evidence was presented to attest to the existence of the dodecahedron crystal. How do we know that the ridge is there, or did Chris Price draw an imagery line over the mid-Atlantic ridge? This is why this article appeared in New Age and not Nature.

If there was a dodecahedron crystal underground, could we detect it? During an earthquake the whole earth “rings”. Shock waves spread out from the epicenter and can be deflected off the internal structure of the planet. Do I really have to say that this data is not compatible with the dodecahedron hypothesis?

The Sacred Places of Saskatchewan has taken the ley line concept and crystal earth hypothesis as true, and drawn out the grid on to a picture of Saskatchewan. I can not dignify this image with the title of map. It has no scale and not even a hint of a map projection. Map projection is important, as all maps have distortions: some projections conserve area, others distance. A map without the scale or projection is pretty much meaningless. The author apparently copied the lines by hand, not a very accurate method. The sacred sites which are supposed to be along these lines are represented by points so large, they occupy an area larger than Saskatoon or Regina.

**********************************************

This photo has been removed by the request of Roger Nelson, whose comments may be viewed below. You may view the map here. Note nothing on scale of the map shown here is accurate to within a couple of inches.

**********************************************

The website offers tours of these lines. How that is even possible, given such large inaccuracies? If these lines are within +/-10 km, that would be impressive. Since there is no objective way to determine where the ley lines are to be found, this map is worthless. I suppose the tours will at least deliver you some fresh air. The problem with maps such as these is that they have the illusion of accuracy, nothing more. Here is another prime example of this: the author goes from a 1: 1,000,000 map to a 1:50,000 map with no explanation. I’ve changed my mind: if those ley lines are within +/- 50 km, I’ll be amazed!

Conclusion

If ley line hunters want to be taken seriously, I have some advice: buy a GPS receiver. They are not expensive. You will be able to locate your features to +/- 10 m, which is so much better then +/- 10 km. Combine this with some free mapping software, and you will be able to create a truly meaningful map. I predict that the “perfect” alignment of the ley line features will vanish with the improved accuracy. It does not matter though: collecting GPS data for sacred shines and other places in Saskatchewan is still an adventure. These areas are beautiful on their own terns. With apologies to Douglas Adams: isn’t it better to realize that a place is beautiful without having to believe the earth is giant dodecahedron crystal?

Links

Wikipedia: Ley Lines

Skepdic: Ley Lines

Advertisements

5 Responses to “Ley Lines”

  1. Cool, I don’t have to look for these things anymore. Its quite a collection and I guess, what is sacred – the site list everything from medicine wheels to trees. Obviously on of the problems, sacred to one person or universally sacred? Is there a scale of sacredness, that would be cool.

    Because they are rare, medicine wheels are reasonably well documented, certainly down to the error of the width of a line on a topographic map. So the lay line locations are known, plot them. I would do it except I would not know a ley line if it poked me in the eye.

    PS that list of sacred sites is pretty anemic, there are a lot more that I know of (using their examples to define sacredness).

  2. If you are going to dis the work, you could at least credit the source, No claim is made that ley lines run in straight lines. In fact study of the work suggests that they do not that they are effected by ore bodies, differences in density in the earth’s crust. Your ignorace of this shows in your comments. No one is asking for you to believe what you can not yourself feel or sense. The so called Blue Grid which you question in this Blog, is something that people can feel. To the people that experience this the sensation is very real. Others are oblivious to the experience. I am assuming that you fall into the latter category. Blind people have to take in on faith that there is something such and eyesight.

    There is no question that the people that built Wanuskewin did it for a reason unrelated to ley lines, in fact and were called to do it for different reasons I am sure. To understand why this place was build we would need to have a conversation with the builders or at least thier descendents. The Ley line in my story is unrelated to that place and for that matter also to the Blue Grid/Earth crystal grid. So you over simplify.

    As for the Saskatchewan map that you linked to in violation of the copywrite statement clearly given on the page and on the map, it clearly states that it is an approximation. The true placement of these lines does account for the curvature of the earth and is accurate to a matter of inches. The map was drawn using Adobe Illustrator by me, to be sure, did not want to violate anyone’s rights to other works, so I had to create my own version. A point of law that apparently is lost on you.

    Yes, I use a GPS receiver, and mapping software and I suspect I have seen far more of the beautiful Province of Saskatchewan than you have.

    Anyone that is interested in finding the truth visit my website, read the material and send me an email. http://www.shrinesandsacredsites.com

    Roger

  3. Koinosuke Says:

    Funny I thought I linked to your site right at the beginning. I was finally able to track down the original article on the crystal earth, which I link to, it does not mention ore bodies at all. This is the origin of the of so-called grids around the world.

    Adobe Illustrator is not GIS software tool it is a drawing tool. There is still the criticism that this map has no scale bar, no projection, and no statement of accuracy. After working almost 10 years in the geomatics industry I never heard of GIS layers being under copyright. The earth is the earth in principal any one can repeat the work. Of course this presumes these features even exist. I have yet to find a shred of evidence that these features exist and yes I have read your site.

    Here is what I need to see to convince me. What instrument do need to detect these sacred sites? What tests do you run to verify that you have a genuine sacred site? And finally what is a sacred site. As the first commenter pointed out you have a real mixed bag: medicine wheels and trees? what is the connection?

    A point of law that you are missing is that of Fair dealing or Fair Use. Using an image for the purpose of criticism is allowed under the law. If it really bothers you I’ll just link to the image. I’ll make the change tonight.

  4. “Blind people have to take in on faith that there is something such and eyesight. ” (at the risk of copyright infringement)

    Actually, I doubt very much that blind people have to take it “on faith” that there is such a thing as eyesight. Rough tests can be run about the predictive power of someone else’s eyesight that can be verified using other senses available to the blind. This is different “in kind” to faith claims.

    “There is a table about two steps in front of you.” stomp-stomp-“OW!”

    You may think a pathetic appeal to qualia is a safe haven to protect your nonsense from critique, but even reasonable hand-drawn facsimiles of critical acuity can dismantle your pathetic attempts at obfuscation…

    …sight unseen.

  5. Let’s try this again:

    “Funny I thought I linked to your site right at the beginning.”

    Yes you did but they you copied images, without showing source, allowing the information to be taken out of context.

    “I was finally able to track down the original article on the crystal earth, which I link to; it does not mention ore bodies at all. This is the origin of the of so-called grids around the world.”
    I agree, also crystal earth is not about ley lines. Many people think this, but it’s just not that way. True ley lines are affected by ore bodies, water bodies and other variances in density in the earth’s crust.

    “There is still the criticism that this map has no scale bar, no projection, and no statement of accuracy.”

    The map I show is more of an illustration than a map. Scale bar, projection etc. was intentionally omitted from the graphic on the web site.

    “After working almost 10 years in the geometrics industry I never heard of GIS layers being under copyright.”

    True, but individuals/companies do own specific representations of maps. Especially when they are selling them in Bookstores and they would take exception to you photocopying and selling their maps if you were to do that.

    “Of course this presumes these features even exist. I have yet to find a shred of evidence that these features exist and yes I have read your site.”

    I would say that you have not looked in the right places for this evidence then or you have no means of measuring it. Others have a different view and to them these things are real.

    “What instrument do need to detect these sacred sites? What tests do you run to verify that you have a genuine sacred site? And finally what is a sacred site. As the first commenter pointed out you have a real mixed bag: medicine wheels and trees? what is the connection?”

    You have really landed on the essential criteria that I have regarding the definition of a Sacred Site. These places qualify for the distinction because people have identified these places as being Sacred. They have voted with their feet, through attendance at events at these sites over a long period of time. Why are they drawn to these places? why did they construct edifices in these places? Carve images in the rocks? Leave offerings to their deities? These places have been made sacred by their devotions over an extended period of time. Let’s just say, the evidence of sacredness is born out by the devotions of the people that have made these places sacred. That is the evidence.

    “A point of law that you are missing is that of Fair dealing or Fair Use. Using an image for the purpose of criticism is allowed under the law. If it really bothers you I’ll just link to the image. I’ll make the change tonight.” Actually that is all I ask, let the reader judge for them selves by reviewing the presentation of the image in its original context.

    Lastly, thanks for visiting my website and the criticism, I will be taking all the comments into consideration. I have in my travels heard many tall tales; some under critical scrutiny prove to be just that, others merit more investigation. You input has been helpful.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: